Pregnant? Welcome.

Dr Loo, the founder of The GiGi, and a mother of 3, realizing a pregnant mummy deserves special care. Hence we developed our unique Pregnancy Oral Health Plan with the aim to cover all needs of an expecting mother and it maximises the chances for a healthy, smooth and happy pregnancy.

How does pregnancy affect your mouth?

We understand you have so much to think about during pregnancy, but also don’t overlook your oral health, which can be affected by the hormonal changes you will experience during this time. Although many women make it nine months with no dental discomfort, pregnancy can make some conditions worse – or create new ones. We therefore recommend regular checkups and good dental health habits, which will help keep you and your baby healthy.

Pregnancy Gingivitis

Your mouth can be affected by the hormonal changes you will experience during pregnancy. For example, some women develop a condition known as “pregnancy gingivitis,” an inflammation of the gums that can cause swelling and tenderness. Your gums may also bleed a little when you brush or floss. Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to more serious forms of gum disease.

Increased Risk of Tooth Decay

Pregnant women may be more prone to cavities for a number of reasons. If you’re eating more carbohydrates than usual, this can cause decay. Morning sickness can increase the amount of acid your mouth is exposed to, which can eat away at the outer covering of your tooth (enamel).

Pregnancy Tumors

In some women, overgrowths of tissue called “pregnancy tumors” appear on the gums, most often during the second trimester. It is not cancer but rather just swelling that happens most often between teeth. They may be related to excess plaque. They bleed easily and have a red, raw-looking raspberry-like appearance. They usually disappear after your baby is born, but if you are concerned, talk to your dentist about removing them.

Pregnancy and newborn oral health

How to take care of your teeth during pregnancy?

7 tips for maintaining a healthy mouth during pregnancy

  • Brush thoroughly with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste twice a day.
  • Floss between your teeth daily.
  • Purchase products that have the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • Eat a balanced diet. If you snack, do so in moderation.
  • Visit your dentist regularly for a professional cleaning and check-up.
  • If you need help controlling plaque, your dentist may recommend rinsing at night with an antimicrobial mouth rinse.
  • If you have morning sickness and are vomiting frequently, try rinsing with a teaspoon of baking soda mixed with water to stop stomach acid from attacking your teeth.

When to visit a dentist during pregnancy?

You are encouraged to visit your dentist as early as when you plan to to be pregnant or once you know you are pregnant. Visiting your dentist as early as possible is important because good dental health can be ensured during pregnancy and treatment needed can be planned.

Let your dentist know how far along you are and whether you have received any special advice from your physician. If your pregnancy is high-risk or if you have certain medical conditions, your dentist and your physician may recommend that some treatments be postponed.

Oral Health & Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding May Help Build a Better Bite

Several recent studies, one in Paediatrics in 2015 and one in the August 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, found that babies who were exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months were less likely to have teeth alignment issues such as open bites, cross-bites, and overbites, than those exclusively breast fed for shorter lengths of time or not at all. Still, this doesn’t mean your exclusively breastfed baby won’t need braces someday. Other factors, including genetics, pacifier use, and thumb-sucking, affect alignment.

Should I Stop Breastfeeding When Your Baby Gets Teeth

It’s a question that often pops up in parenting message boards and conversations with new moms: Should I stop breastfeeding when my baby starts teething? The answer is not if you don’t want to.

Need Dental Work Done? Double Check Your Medications

If you need to have a dental procedure that requires medication while nursing, check with your dentist, personal physician and paediatrician to make sure it is safe for baby. “It’s important to know there are antibiotics we can give you that won’t hurt the baby,” Dr. Sahota says. “It’s not only safe to go to the dentist while you’re pregnant and while you’re nursing, it’s very important to do so for the best health of your child.”

The GiGi pregnancy oral health plans

With yours, and your babies safety and well-being in mind, we have developed a comprehensive oral health plan, which will not only cover all of your needs during pregnancy, but also includes an oral health assessment of your newborn.

Depending on when in your pregnancy you join the The GiGi, you can choose from one of three packages.

1st TRIMESTER SIGN-UP


1. Plaque indicator and oral health advice
2. Oral health spa x 3
3. Oral health kit  x 3
4. Gum protection kit x 3
5. Newborn check up
6. The GiGi privilege membership
and more…
2nd TRIMESTER SIGN UP


1. plaque indicator and oral health advice
2. oral health spa x 2
3. Oral health kit  x 2
4. Gum protection kit x 2
5. Newborn check up
6. The GiGi privilege membership
and more…
3rd TRIMESTER SIGN UP


1. plaque indicator and oral health advice
2. oral health spa x 1
3. Oral health kit  x 1
4. Gum protection kit x 1
5. Newborn check up
6. The GiGi privilege membership
and more…

Frequently Asked Questions

In between trips to the doctor, hospital tours and setting up the nursery, don’t let visiting the dentist fall off your pregnancy to-do list before your baby comes. Getting a checkup during pregnancy is safe and important for your dental health. Not only can you take care of cleanings and procedures like cavity fillings before your baby is born, but your dentist can help you with any pregnancy-related dental symptoms you might be experiencing.

You are encouraged to visit your dentist as early as when you plan to to be pregnant or once you know you are pregnant. Visiting your dentist as early as possible is important because good dental health can be ensured during pregnancy and treatment needed can be planned.

Let your dentist know how far along you are and whether you have received any special advice from your physician. If your pregnancy is high-risk or if you have certain medical conditions, your dentist and your physician may recommend that some treatments be postponed.

Be sure your dentist knows what, if any, prescription medications and over-the-counter drugs you are taking. This information will help your dentist determine what type of prescription, if any, to write for you.

Your dentist can consult with your physician to choose medications—such as pain relievers or antibiotics—you may safely take during the pregnancy. Both your dentist and physician are concerned about you and your baby, so ask them any questions you have about medications they recommend.

Most experts agree that procedures like cavity fillings and crowns are safe and important to have during pregnancy to prevent potential infection. It may be more uncomfortable to sit in a dental chair the later you are in pregnancy, so schedule dental work in your first trimester, if possible.

Cosmetic procedures, like whitening, should wait until after baby arrives. If you need an emergency procedure, work with your dentist on the best plan for the health of you and your baby.

If you’re pregnant and need a filling, root canal or tooth pulled, one thing you don’t have to worry about is the safety of the numbing medications your dentist may use during the procedure. They are, in fact, safe for both you and your baby.

Yes, dental X-rays are safe during pregnancy. Your dentist or hygienist will cover you with a protective apron that minimises exposure to the abdomen. Your dental office will also whenever possible cover your throat with a protective thyroid collar to protect the thyroid from radiation.

With pregnancy come changes in your body, emotions and mouth. As many as half of all women develop pregnancy gingivitis, a mild form of gum disease that is most common between the second and eighth months of pregnancy.

It usually goes away after childbirth. Hormones make your gums more easily irritated by plaque and can cause gums to be red, tender, sore and bleed. Brush twice a day for two minutes, clean between your teeth once a day, and talk to your dentist about other steps you can take to keep your gums healthy.

Unfortunately, morning sickness can hit any time of the day. Vomit contains stomach acids that can eat away at your teeth, so waiting to brush after you’ve rinsed your mouth can help prevent those acids from doing damage. Instead of brushing, first swish and spit. You can use water, a diluted mouth rinse or a mixture of 1 cup of water and 1 tsp. of baking soda. Spit it out, and brush your teeth about 30 minutes later.

No, this is an old wives’ tale. Losing a tooth is not a normal part of pregnancy, and if you do, you most likely already had an existing dental problem. You may, however, feel like your teeth are a bit loose. According to the Mayo Clinic, progesterone and oestrogen can loosen the ligaments and bones that keep your teeth in place, even if you don’t have gum disease. Many times this goes away after pregnancy, but talk to your dentist if you feel like your teeth are moving when they shouldn’t.

Your baby’s teeth begin to develop between the third and sixth months of pregnancy, and eating well can help them form correctly. Get plenty of nutrients – including vitamins A, C, and D, protein, calcium and phosphorous.

To reduce the risk of neural tube defects, you need 600 mcg of folic acid each day while pregnant. Take folic acid supplements, and eat foods high in folate. While you’re at it, drink plenty of water with fluoride to keep your own teeth strong.

Any questions or looking for a way to enrol? Simple. Contact the GiGi.